Reading Comprehensions Exercise – 2

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Here is a Exercise on RC Passages with 25 questions. Select the answers and click “Next”. Time yourself for 15 minutes. (one shouldn’t take more than that to answer these questions). Answers will be displayed after the completion of the quiz. Go ahead… All the best!!

Today, bicycles are elegantly simple machines that are common around the world. Many people ride bicycles for recreation, whereas others use them as a means of transportation. The first bicycle, called a draisienne, was invented in Germany in 1818 by Baron Karl de Drais de Sauerbrun. Because it was made of wood, the draisienne wasn’t very durable nor did it have pedals. Riders moved it by pushing their feet against the ground.

In 1839, Kirkpatrick Macmillan, a Scottish blacksmith, invented a much better bicycle. Macmillan’s machine had tires with iron rims to keep them from getting worn down. He also used foot-operated cranks, similar to pedals, so his bicycle could be ridden at a quick pace. It didn’t look much like the modern bicycle, though, because its back wheel was substantially larger than its front wheel. Although Macmillan’s bicycles could be ridden easily, they were never produced in large numbers.

In 1861, Frenchman Pierre Michaux and his brother Ernest invented a bicycle with an improved crank mechanism. They called their bicycle a velocipede, but most people called it a “bone shaker” because of the jarring effect of the wood and iron frame. Despite the unflattering nickname, th velocipede was a hit. After a few years, the Michaux family was making hundreds of the machines annually, mostly for fun-seeking young people.

Ten years later, James Starley, an English inventor, made several innovations that revolutionized bicycle design. He made the front wheel many times larger than the back wheel, put a gear on the pedals to make the bicycle more efficient, and lightened the wheels by using wire spokes. Although this bicycle was much lighter and less tiring to ride, it was still clumsy, extremely top-heavy, and ridden mostly for entertainment.

I wasn’t until 1874 that the first truly modern bicycle appeared on the scene. Invented by another Englishman, H J Lawson, the safety bicycle would look familiar to today’s cycles. The safety bicycle had equal-sized wheels, which made it much less prone to toppling over. Lawson also attached a chain to the pedals to drive the rear wheel. By 1893, the safety bicyle had been further improved with air-filled rubber tires, a diamond-shaped frame, and easy braking. With the improvements provided by Lawson, bicycles became extremely popular and useful for transportation. Today, they are built, used, and enjoyed all over the world.

1. There is enough information in this passage to show that






Today, bicycles are elegantly simple machines that are common around the world. Many people ride bicycles for recreation, whereas others use them as a means of transportation. The first bicycle, called a draisienne, was invented in Germany in 1818 by Baron Karl de Drais de Sauerbrun. Because it was made of wood, the draisienne wasn’t very durable nor did it have pedals. Riders moved it by pushing their feet against the ground.

In 1839, Kirkpatrick Macmillan, a Scottish blacksmith, invented a much better bicycle. Macmillan’s machine had tires with iron rims to keep them from getting worn down. He also used foot-operated cranks, similar to pedals, so his bicycle could be ridden at a quick pace. It didn’t look much like the modern bicycle, though, because its back wheel was substantially larger than its front wheel. Although Macmillan’s bicycles could be ridden easily, they were never produced in large numbers.

In 1861, Frenchman Pierre Michaux and his brother Ernest invented a bicycle with an improved crank mechanism. They called their bicycle a velocipede, but most people called it a “bone shaker” because of the jarring effect of the wood and iron frame. Despite the unflattering nickname, th velocipede was a hit. After a few years, the Michaux family was making hundreds of the machines annually, mostly for fun-seeking young people.

Ten years later, James Starley, an English inventor, made several innovations that revolutionized bicycle design. He made the front wheel many times larger than the back wheel, put a gear on the pedals to make the bicycle more efficient, and lightened the wheels by using wire spokes. Although this bicycle was much lighter and less tiring to ride, it was still clumsy, extremely top-heavy, and ridden mostly for entertainment.

I wasn’t until 1874 that the first truly modern bicycle appeared on the scene. Invented by another Englishman, H J Lawson, the safety bicycle would look familiar to today’s cycles. The safety bicycle had equal-sized wheels, which made it much less prone to toppling over. Lawson also attached a chain to the pedals to drive the rear wheel. By 1893, the safety bicyle had been further improved with air-filled rubber tires, a diamond-shaped frame, and easy braking. With the improvements provided by Lawson, bicycles became extremely popular and useful for transportation. Today, they are built, used, and enjoyed all over the world.

2. The first person to use a gear system on bicycles was






Today, bicycles are elegantly simple machines that are common around the world. Many people ride bicycles for recreation, whereas others use them as a means of transportation. The first bicycle, called a draisienne, was invented in Germany in 1818 by Baron Karl de Drais de Sauerbrun. Because it was made of wood, the draisienne wasn’t very durable nor did it have pedals. Riders moved it by pushing their feet against the ground.

In 1839, Kirkpatrick Macmillan, a Scottish blacksmith, invented a much better bicycle. Macmillan’s machine had tires with iron rims to keep them from getting worn down. He also used foot-operated cranks, similar to pedals, so his bicycle could be ridden at a quick pace. It didn’t look much like the modern bicycle, though, because its back wheel was substantially larger than its front wheel. Although Macmillan’s bicycles could be ridden easily, they were never produced in large numbers.

In 1861, Frenchman Pierre Michaux and his brother Ernest invented a bicycle with an improved crank mechanism. They called their bicycle a velocipede, but most people called it a “bone shaker” because of the jarring effect of the wood and iron frame. Despite the unflattering nickname, th velocipede was a hit. After a few years, the Michaux family was making hundreds of the machines annually, mostly for fun-seeking young people.

Ten years later, James Starley, an English inventor, made several innovations that revolutionized bicycle design. He made the front wheel many times larger than the back wheel, put a gear on the pedals to make the bicycle more efficient, and lightened the wheels by using wire spokes. Although this bicycle was much lighter and less tiring to ride, it was still clumsy, extremely top-heavy, and ridden mostly for entertainment.

I wasn’t until 1874 that the first truly modern bicycle appeared on the scene. Invented by another Englishman, H J Lawson, the safety bicycle would look familiar to today’s cycles. The safety bicycle had equal-sized wheels, which made it much less prone to toppling over. Lawson also attached a chain to the pedals to drive the rear wheel. By 1893, the safety bicyle had been further improved with air-filled rubber tires, a diamond-shaped frame, and easy braking. With the improvements provided by Lawson, bicycles became extremely popular and useful for transportation. Today, they are built, used, and enjoyed all over the world.

3. This passage was most likely written in order to






Today, bicycles are elegantly simple machines that are common around the world. Many people ride bicycles for recreation, whereas others use them as a means of transportation. The first bicycle, called a draisienne, was invented in Germany in 1818 by Baron Karl de Drais de Sauerbrun. Because it was made of wood, the draisienne wasn’t very durable nor did it have pedals. Riders moved it by pushing their feet against the ground.

In 1839, Kirkpatrick Macmillan, a Scottish blacksmith, invented a much better bicycle. Macmillan’s machine had tires with iron rims to keep them from getting worn down. He also used foot-operated cranks, similar to pedals, so his bicycle could be ridden at a quick pace. It didn’t look much like the modern bicycle, though, because its back wheel was substantially larger than its front wheel. Although Macmillan’s bicycles could be ridden easily, they were never produced in large numbers.

In 1861, Frenchman Pierre Michaux and his brother Ernest invented a bicycle with an improved crank mechanism. They called their bicycle a velocipede, but most people called it a “bone shaker” because of the jarring effect of the wood and iron frame. Despite the unflattering nickname, th velocipede was a hit. After a few years, the Michaux family was making hundreds of the machines annually, mostly for fun-seeking young people.

Ten years later, James Starley, an English inventor, made several innovations that revolutionized bicycle design. He made the front wheel many times larger than the back wheel, put a gear on the pedals to make the bicycle more efficient, and lightened the wheels by using wire spokes. Although this bicycle was much lighter and less tiring to ride, it was still clumsy, extremely top-heavy, and ridden mostly for entertainment.

I wasn’t until 1874 that the first truly modern bicycle appeared on the scene. Invented by another Englishman, H J Lawson, the safety bicycle would look familiar to today’s cycles. The safety bicycle had equal-sized wheels, which made it much less prone to toppling over. Lawson also attached a chain to the pedals to drive the rear wheel. By 1893, the safety bicyle had been further improved with air-filled rubber tires, a diamond-shaped frame, and easy braking. With the improvements provided by Lawson, bicycles became extremely popular and useful for transportation. Today, they are built, used, and enjoyed all over the world.

4. Macmillan added iron rims to the tires of his bicycle to






Today, bicycles are elegantly simple machines that are common around the world. Many people ride bicycles for recreation, whereas others use them as a means of transportation. The first bicycle, called a draisienne, was invented in Germany in 1818 by Baron Karl de Drais de Sauerbrun. Because it was made of wood, the draisienne wasn’t very durable nor did it have pedals. Riders moved it by pushing their feet against the ground.

In 1839, Kirkpatrick Macmillan, a Scottish blacksmith, invented a much better bicycle. Macmillan’s machine had tires with iron rims to keep them from getting worn down. He also used foot-operated cranks, similar to pedals, so his bicycle could be ridden at a quick pace. It didn’t look much like the modern bicycle, though, because its back wheel was substantially larger than its front wheel. Although Macmillan’s bicycles could be ridden easily, they were never produced in large numbers.

In 1861, Frenchman Pierre Michaux and his brother Ernest invented a bicycle with an improved crank mechanism. They called their bicycle a velocipede, but most people called it a “bone shaker” because of the jarring effect of the wood and iron frame. Despite the unflattering nickname, th velocipede was a hit. After a few years, the Michaux family was making hundreds of the machines annually, mostly for fun-seeking young people.

Ten years later, James Starley, an English inventor, made several innovations that revolutionized bicycle design. He made the front wheel many times larger than the back wheel, put a gear on the pedals to make the bicycle more efficient, and lightened the wheels by using wire spokes. Although this bicycle was much lighter and less tiring to ride, it was still clumsy, extremely top-heavy, and ridden mostly for entertainment.

I wasn’t until 1874 that the first truly modern bicycle appeared on the scene. Invented by another Englishman, H J Lawson, the safety bicycle would look familiar to today’s cycles. The safety bicycle had equal-sized wheels, which made it much less prone to toppling over. Lawson also attached a chain to the pedals to drive the rear wheel. By 1893, the safety bicyle had been further improved with air-filled rubber tires, a diamond-shaped frame, and easy braking. With the improvements provided by Lawson, bicycles became extremely popular and useful for transportation. Today, they are built, used, and enjoyed all over the world.

5.Read the following sentence from the fourth paragraph:

Ten years later, James Starley, an English inventor, made several innovations that revolutionized bicycle design.

As it is used in the sentence, the underlined word revolutionzed most nearly means






Today, bicycles are elegantly simple machines that are common around the world. Many people ride bicycles for recreation, whereas others use them as a means of transportation. The first bicycle, called a draisienne, was invented in Germany in 1818 by Baron Karl de Drais de Sauerbrun. Because it was made of wood, the draisienne wasn’t very durable nor did it have pedals. Riders moved it by pushing their feet against the ground.

In 1839, Kirkpatrick Macmillan, a Scottish blacksmith, invented a much better bicycle. Macmillan’s machine had tires with iron rims to keep them from getting worn down. He also used foot-operated cranks, similar to pedals, so his bicycle could be ridden at a quick pace. It didn’t look much like the modern bicycle, though, because its back wheel was substantially larger than its front wheel. Although Macmillan’s bicycles could be ridden easily, they were never produced in large numbers.

In 1861, Frenchman Pierre Michaux and his brother Ernest invented a bicycle with an improved crank mechanism. They called their bicycle a velocipede, but most people called it a “bone shaker” because of the jarring effect of the wood and iron frame. Despite the unflattering nickname, th velocipede was a hit. After a few years, the Michaux family was making hundreds of the machines annually, mostly for fun-seeking young people.

Ten years later, James Starley, an English inventor, made several innovations that revolutionized bicycle design. He made the front wheel many times larger than the back wheel, put a gear on the pedals to make the bicycle more efficient, and lightened the wheels by using wire spokes. Although this bicycle was much lighter and less tiring to ride, it was still clumsy, extremely top-heavy, and ridden mostly for entertainment.

I wasn’t until 1874 that the first truly modern bicycle appeared on the scene. Invented by another Englishman, H J Lawson, the safety bicycle would look familiar to today’s cycles. The safety bicycle had equal-sized wheels, which made it much less prone to toppling over. Lawson also attached a chain to the pedals to drive the rear wheel. By 1893, the safety bicyle had been further improved with air-filled rubber tires, a diamond-shaped frame, and easy braking. With the improvements provided by Lawson, bicycles became extremely popular and useful for transportation. Today, they are built, used, and enjoyed all over the world.

6. Which of the following statements from the passage represents the writer’s opinion?






Abraham Lincoln served as the 16th President of the United States yet her never went to a college. In fact, Lincoln had nearly no formal education whatsoever, attending schools for less than a year throughout his childhood. Yet this should not be construed to mean that Lincoln was ignorant or unlearned; on the contrary, he was one of the most well-read leaders of the time. The fact is that Abraham Lincoln educated himself by studying books of religion, philosophy, and literature, and he continued his voracious reading throughout his life.

A lack of public school education did not prevent Lincoln from becoming a great leader. he led the United States through four years of civil war, which threatened to divide the nation into two separate countries. He was a powerful opponent of slavery, and it was largely through his leadership that slavery was abolished in this country.

Lincoln’s determination to educate himself through diligent reading also led to his reputation as a great orator – and even today his speeches are quoted and studied worldwide. He serves as an example of a great leader – and a great reader. His love of books and good literature enabled Abe Lincoln to rise to world renown.

7. What is the main idea of this passage?





Abraham Lincoln served as the 16th President of the United States yet her never went to a college. In fact, Lincoln had nearly no formal education whatsoever, attending schools for less than a year throughout his childhood. Yet this should not be construed to mean that Lincoln was ignorant or unlearned; on the contrary, he was one of the most well-read leaders of the time. The fact is that Abraham Lincoln educated himself by studying books of religion, philosophy, and literature, and he continued his voracious reading throughout his life.

A lack of public school education did not prevent Lincoln from becoming a great leader. he led the United States through four years of civil war, which threatened to divide the nation into two separate countries. He was a powerful opponent of slavery, and it was largely through his leadership that slavery was abolished in this country.

Lincoln’s determination to educate himself through diligent reading also led to his reputation as a great orator – and even today his speeches are quoted and studied worldwide. He serves as an example of a great leader – and a great reader. His love of books and good literature enabled Abe Lincoln to rise to world renown.

8. Lincoln accomplished all of the following EXCEPT





Abraham Lincoln served as the 16th President of the United States yet her never went to a college. In fact, Lincoln had nearly no formal education whatsoever, attending schools for less than a year throughout his childhood. Yet this should not be construed to mean that Lincoln was ignorant or unlearned; on the contrary, he was one of the most well-read leaders of the time. The fact is that Abraham Lincoln educated himself by studying books of religion, philosophy, and literature, and he continued his voracious reading throughout his life.

A lack of public school education did not prevent Lincoln from becoming a great leader. he led the United States through four years of civil war, which threatened to divide the nation into two separate countries. He was a powerful opponent of slavery, and it was largely through his leadership that slavery was abolished in this country.

Lincoln’s determination to educate himself through diligent reading also led to his reputation as a great orator – and even today his speeches are quoted and studied worldwide. He serves as an example of a great leader – and a great reader. His love of books and good literature enabled Abe Lincoln to rise to world renown.

9. A voracious reader is





Abraham Lincoln served as the 16th President of the United States yet her never went to a college. In fact, Lincoln had nearly no formal education whatsoever, attending schools for less than a year throughout his childhood. Yet this should not be construed to mean that Lincoln was ignorant or unlearned; on the contrary, he was one of the most well-read leaders of the time. The fact is that Abraham Lincoln educated himself by studying books of religion, philosophy, and literature, and he continued his voracious reading throughout his life.

A lack of public school education did not prevent Lincoln from becoming a great leader. he led the United States through four years of civil war, which threatened to divide the nation into two separate countries. He was a powerful opponent of slavery, and it was largely through his leadership that slavery was abolished in this country.

Lincoln’s determination to educate himself through diligent reading also led to his reputation as a great orator – and even today his speeches are quoted and studied worldwide. He serves as an example of a great leader – and a great reader. His love of books and good literature enabled Abe Lincoln to rise to world renown.

10. The underlined word construed, as used in paragraph 1, most nearly means





Abraham Lincoln served as the 16th President of the United States yet her never went to a college. In fact, Lincoln had nearly no formal education whatsoever, attending schools for less than a year throughout his childhood. Yet this should not be construed to mean that Lincoln was ignorant or unlearned; on the contrary, he was one of the most well-read leaders of the time. The fact is that Abraham Lincoln educated himself by studying books of religion, philosophy, and literature, and he continued his voracious reading throughout his life.

A lack of public school education did not prevent Lincoln from becoming a great leader. he led the United States through four years of civil war, which threatened to divide the nation into two separate countries. He was a powerful opponent of slavery, and it was largely through his leadership that slavery was abolished in this country.

Lincoln’s determination to educate himself through diligent reading also led to his reputation as a great orator – and even today his speeches are quoted and studied worldwide. He serves as an example of a great leader – and a great reader. His love of books and good literature enabled Abe Lincoln to rise to world renown.

11. According to the passage, what lesson can be learned from the life of Abraham Lincoln?





Abraham Lincoln served as the 16th President of the United States yet her never went to a college. In fact, Lincoln had nearly no formal education whatsoever, attending schools for less than a year throughout his childhood. Yet this should not be construed to mean that Lincoln was ignorant or unlearned; on the contrary, he was one of the most well-read leaders of the time. The fact is that Abraham Lincoln educated himself by studying books of religion, philosophy, and literature, and he continued his voracious reading throughout his life.

A lack of public school education did not prevent Lincoln from becoming a great leader. he led the United States through four years of civil war, which threatened to divide the nation into two separate countries. He was a powerful opponent of slavery, and it was largely through his leadership that slavery was abolished in this country.

Lincoln’s determination to educate himself through diligent reading also led to his reputation as a great orator – and even today his speeches are quoted and studied worldwide. He serves as an example of a great leader – and a great reader. His love of books and good literature enabled Abe Lincoln to rise to world renown.

12. How does Lincoln still affect students today?





Arteries of the heart blocked by plaque can reduce the flow of blood to the heart possibly resulting in heart attack or death. Plaque is actually fat and cholesterol that accumulates on the inside of the arteries. The arteries of the heart are small and can be blocked by such accumulations. There is a medical procedure that creates more space in the blocked artery by inserting and inflating a tiny balloon into blood vessel. It is called coronary balloon angioplasty. Angioplasty means “blood vessel repair.” When the balloon in inflated, it compresses the plaque against the wall of the artery, creating more space and improving the flow of blood.

Many doctors choose this technique, because it is less invasive that bypass surgery. Yes, both involve entering the body cavity, but in bypass surgery, the chest must be opened, the rids must be cut, and the section of diseased artery must be removed and replaced. To replace it, the patient’s body is opened, once again, to acquire a healthy section of artery. Usually, this blood vessel is removed from an artery located in the calf of the leg. This means the patient now has two painful incisions that must heal at the same time. There is far more risk in such bypass surgery than in angioplasty, which involves threading a thin tube, called a catheter, into the circulatory system and working it to the damaged artery.

Angioplasty may take between 30 minutes to 3 hours to complete. It begins with a distinctive dye that is injected into the bloodstream. A thin catheter is then inserted into the femoral artery of the leg, near the groin. The doctor monitors the path of the dye using x-rays. He moves the tube through the heart and into the plague-filled artery. He inflates the balloon, creating more space, deflates the balloon, and removes the tube. It is important to note that the plaque has not been removed; it has just been compressed against the sides of the artery. Sometimes, a stent may be implanted, a tiny tube of stainless steel that is expandable when necessary. Its function is to keep the artery open.

There is good news and there is bad news. The good news is that the statistics compiled are superb. Ninety percent of all angioplasty procedures are successful. The risk of dying during an operation of this type is less than 2%. The risk of heart attack is also small: 3-5%. Yet heart surgeons do not take any risk lightly; therefore, a team of surgeons stands ready to perform bypass surgery if needed. The length of hospitalization is only three days. The bad news is twofold. First, this procedure treats the condition but does not eradicate the cause. In 20% of the cases, there is a recurrence of plaque. Second, angioplasty is not recommended for all patients. The surgeons must consider the patient’s age, physical history, how severe the blockage is, and, finally, the degree of damage to the artery before they make their determination.

13. When coronary arteries are blocked by plaque, one of the results could be





Arteries of the heart blocked by plaque can reduce the flow of blood to the heart possibly resulting in heart attack or death. Plaque is actually fat and cholesterol that accumulates on the inside of the arteries. The arteries of the heart are small and can be blocked by such accumulations. There is a medical procedure that creates more space in the blocked artery by inserting and inflating a tiny balloon into blood vessel. It is called coronary balloon angioplasty. Angioplasty means “blood vessel repair.” When the balloon in inflated, it compresses the plaque against the wall of the artery, creating more space and improving the flow of blood.

Many doctors choose this technique, because it is less invasive that bypass surgery. Yes, both involve entering the body cavity, but in bypass surgery, the chest must be opened, the rids must be cut, and the section of diseased artery must be removed and replaced. To replace it, the patient’s body is opened, once again, to acquire a healthy section of artery. Usually, this blood vessel is removed from an artery located in the calf of the leg. This means the patient now has two painful incisions that must heal at the same time. There is far more risk in such bypass surgery than in angioplasty, which involves threading a thin tube, called a catheter, into the circulatory system and working it to the damaged artery.

Angioplasty may take between 30 minutes to 3 hours to complete. It begins with a distinctive dye that is injected into the bloodstream. A thin catheter is then inserted into the femoral artery of the leg, near the groin. The doctor monitors the path of the dye using x-rays. He moves the tube through the heart and into the plague-filled artery. He inflates the balloon, creating more space, deflates the balloon, and removes the tube. It is important to note that the plaque has not been removed; it has just been compressed against the sides of the artery. Sometimes, a stent may be implanted, a tiny tube of stainless steel that is expandable when necessary. Its function is to keep the artery open.

There is good news and there is bad news. The good news is that the statistics compiled are superb. Ninety percent of all angioplasty procedures are successful. The risk of dying during an operation of this type is less than 2%. The risk of heart attack is also small: 3-5%. Yet heart surgeons do not take any risk lightly; therefore, a team of surgeons stands ready to perform bypass surgery if needed. The length of hospitalization is only three days. The bad news is twofold. First, this procedure treats the condition but does not eradicate the cause. In 20% of the cases, there is a recurrence of plaque. Second, angioplasty is not recommended for all patients. The surgeons must consider the patient’s age, physical history, how severe the blockage is, and, finally, the degree of damage to the artery before they make their determination.

14. According to the passage, angioplasty is defined as





Arteries of the heart blocked by plaque can reduce the flow of blood to the heart possibly resulting in heart attack or death. Plaque is actually fat and cholesterol that accumulates on the inside of the arteries. The arteries of the heart are small and can be blocked by such accumulations. There is a medical procedure that creates more space in the blocked artery by inserting and inflating a tiny balloon into blood vessel. It is called coronary balloon angioplasty. Angioplasty means “blood vessel repair.” When the balloon in inflated, it compresses the plaque against the wall of the artery, creating more space and improving the flow of blood.

Many doctors choose this technique, because it is less invasive that bypass surgery. Yes, both involve entering the body cavity, but in bypass surgery, the chest must be opened, the rids must be cut, and the section of diseased artery must be removed and replaced. To replace it, the patient’s body is opened, once again, to acquire a healthy section of artery. Usually, this blood vessel is removed from an artery located in the calf of the leg. This means the patient now has two painful incisions that must heal at the same time. There is far more risk in such bypass surgery than in angioplasty, which involves threading a thin tube, called a catheter, into the circulatory system and working it to the damaged artery.

Angioplasty may take between 30 minutes to 3 hours to complete. It begins with a distinctive dye that is injected into the bloodstream. A thin catheter is then inserted into the femoral artery of the leg, near the groin. The doctor monitors the path of the dye using x-rays. He moves the tube through the heart and into the plague-filled artery. He inflates the balloon, creating more space, deflates the balloon, and removes the tube. It is important to note that the plaque has not been removed; it has just been compressed against the sides of the artery. Sometimes, a stent may be implanted, a tiny tube of stainless steel that is expandable when necessary. Its function is to keep the artery open.

There is good news and there is bad news. The good news is that the statistics compiled are superb. Ninety percent of all angioplasty procedures are successful. The risk of dying during an operation of this type is less than 2%. The risk of heart attack is also small: 3-5%. Yet heart surgeons do not take any risk lightly; therefore, a team of surgeons stands ready to perform bypass surgery if needed. The length of hospitalization is only three days. The bad news is twofold. First, this procedure treats the condition but does not eradicate the cause. In 20% of the cases, there is a recurrence of plaque. Second, angioplasty is not recommended for all patients. The surgeons must consider the patient’s age, physical history, how severe the blockage is, and, finally, the degree of damage to the artery before they make their determination.

15. It can be inferred from the passage that invasive most closely means





Arteries of the heart blocked by plaque can reduce the flow of blood to the heart possibly resulting in heart attack or death. Plaque is actually fat and cholesterol that accumulates on the inside of the arteries. The arteries of the heart are small and can be blocked by such accumulations. There is a medical procedure that creates more space in the blocked artery by inserting and inflating a tiny balloon into blood vessel. It is called coronary balloon angioplasty. Angioplasty means “blood vessel repair.” When the balloon in inflated, it compresses the plaque against the wall of the artery, creating more space and improving the flow of blood.

Many doctors choose this technique, because it is less invasive that bypass surgery. Yes, both involve entering the body cavity, but in bypass surgery, the chest must be opened, the rids must be cut, and the section of diseased artery must be removed and replaced. To replace it, the patient’s body is opened, once again, to acquire a healthy section of artery. Usually, this blood vessel is removed from an artery located in the calf of the leg. This means the patient now has two painful incisions that must heal at the same time. There is far more risk in such bypass surgery than in angioplasty, which involves threading a thin tube, called a catheter, into the circulatory system and working it to the damaged artery.

Angioplasty may take between 30 minutes to 3 hours to complete. It begins with a distinctive dye that is injected into the bloodstream. A thin catheter is then inserted into the femoral artery of the leg, near the groin. The doctor monitors the path of the dye using x-rays. He moves the tube through the heart and into the plague-filled artery. He inflates the balloon, creating more space, deflates the balloon, and removes the tube. It is important to note that the plaque has not been removed; it has just been compressed against the sides of the artery. Sometimes, a stent may be implanted, a tiny tube of stainless steel that is expandable when necessary. Its function is to keep the artery open.

There is good news and there is bad news. The good news is that the statistics compiled are superb. Ninety percent of all angioplasty procedures are successful. The risk of dying during an operation of this type is less than 2%. The risk of heart attack is also small: 3-5%. Yet heart surgeons do not take any risk lightly; therefore, a team of surgeons stands ready to perform bypass surgery if needed. The length of hospitalization is only three days. The bad news is twofold. First, this procedure treats the condition but does not eradicate the cause. In 20% of the cases, there is a recurrence of plaque. Second, angioplasty is not recommended for all patients. The surgeons must consider the patient’s age, physical history, how severe the blockage is, and, finally, the degree of damage to the artery before they make their determination.

16. The angioplasty procedure begins with





Arteries of the heart blocked by plaque can reduce the flow of blood to the heart possibly resulting in heart attack or death. Plaque is actually fat and cholesterol that accumulates on the inside of the arteries. The arteries of the heart are small and can be blocked by such accumulations. There is a medical procedure that creates more space in the blocked artery by inserting and inflating a tiny balloon into blood vessel. It is called coronary balloon angioplasty. Angioplasty means “blood vessel repair.” When the balloon in inflated, it compresses the plaque against the wall of the artery, creating more space and improving the flow of blood.

Many doctors choose this technique, because it is less invasive that bypass surgery. Yes, both involve entering the body cavity, but in bypass surgery, the chest must be opened, the rids must be cut, and the section of diseased artery must be removed and replaced. To replace it, the patient’s body is opened, once again, to acquire a healthy section of artery. Usually, this blood vessel is removed from an artery located in the calf of the leg. This means the patient now has two painful incisions that must heal at the same time. There is far more risk in such bypass surgery than in angioplasty, which involves threading a thin tube, called a catheter, into the circulatory system and working it to the damaged artery.

Angioplasty may take between 30 minutes to 3 hours to complete. It begins with a distinctive dye that is injected into the bloodstream. A thin catheter is then inserted into the femoral artery of the leg, near the groin. The doctor monitors the path of the dye using x-rays. He moves the tube through the heart and into the plague-filled artery. He inflates the balloon, creating more space, deflates the balloon, and removes the tube. It is important to note that the plaque has not been removed; it has just been compressed against the sides of the artery. Sometimes, a stent may be implanted, a tiny tube of stainless steel that is expandable when necessary. Its function is to keep the artery open.

There is good news and there is bad news. The good news is that the statistics compiled are superb. Ninety percent of all angioplasty procedures are successful. The risk of dying during an operation of this type is less than 2%. The risk of heart attack is also small: 3-5%. Yet heart surgeons do not take any risk lightly; therefore, a team of surgeons stands ready to perform bypass surgery if needed. The length of hospitalization is only three days. The bad news is twofold. First, this procedure treats the condition but does not eradicate the cause. In 20% of the cases, there is a recurrence of plaque. Second, angioplasty is not recommended for all patients. The surgeons must consider the patient’s age, physical history, how severe the blockage is, and, finally, the degree of damage to the artery before they make their determination.

17. It can be inferred from the passage that





Arteries of the heart blocked by plaque can reduce the flow of blood to the heart possibly resulting in heart attack or death. Plaque is actually fat and cholesterol that accumulates on the inside of the arteries. The arteries of the heart are small and can be blocked by such accumulations. There is a medical procedure that creates more space in the blocked artery by inserting and inflating a tiny balloon into blood vessel. It is called coronary balloon angioplasty. Angioplasty means “blood vessel repair.” When the balloon in inflated, it compresses the plaque against the wall of the artery, creating more space and improving the flow of blood.

Many doctors choose this technique, because it is less invasive that bypass surgery. Yes, both involve entering the body cavity, but in bypass surgery, the chest must be opened, the rids must be cut, and the section of diseased artery must be removed and replaced. To replace it, the patient’s body is opened, once again, to acquire a healthy section of artery. Usually, this blood vessel is removed from an artery located in the calf of the leg. This means the patient now has two painful incisions that must heal at the same time. There is far more risk in such bypass surgery than in angioplasty, which involves threading a thin tube, called a catheter, into the circulatory system and working it to the damaged artery.

Angioplasty may take between 30 minutes to 3 hours to complete. It begins with a distinctive dye that is injected into the bloodstream. A thin catheter is then inserted into the femoral artery of the leg, near the groin. The doctor monitors the path of the dye using x-rays. He moves the tube through the heart and into the plague-filled artery. He inflates the balloon, creating more space, deflates the balloon, and removes the tube. It is important to note that the plaque has not been removed; it has just been compressed against the sides of the artery. Sometimes, a stent may be implanted, a tiny tube of stainless steel that is expandable when necessary. Its function is to keep the artery open.

There is good news and there is bad news. The good news is that the statistics compiled are superb. Ninety percent of all angioplasty procedures are successful. The risk of dying during an operation of this type is less than 2%. The risk of heart attack is also small: 3-5%. Yet heart surgeons do not take any risk lightly; therefore, a team of surgeons stands ready to perform bypass surgery if needed. The length of hospitalization is only three days. The bad news is twofold. First, this procedure treats the condition but does not eradicate the cause. In 20% of the cases, there is a recurrence of plaque. Second, angioplasty is not recommended for all patients. The surgeons must consider the patient’s age, physical history, how severe the blockage is, and, finally, the degree of damage to the artery before they make their determination.

18. What is done in case of a failure of angioplasty?





Arteries of the heart blocked by plaque can reduce the flow of blood to the heart possibly resulting in heart attack or death. Plaque is actually fat and cholesterol that accumulates on the inside of the arteries. The arteries of the heart are small and can be blocked by such accumulations. There is a medical procedure that creates more space in the blocked artery by inserting and inflating a tiny balloon into blood vessel. It is called coronary balloon angioplasty. Angioplasty means “blood vessel repair.” When the balloon in inflated, it compresses the plaque against the wall of the artery, creating more space and improving the flow of blood.

Many doctors choose this technique, because it is less invasive that bypass surgery. Yes, both involve entering the body cavity, but in bypass surgery, the chest must be opened, the rids must be cut, and the section of diseased artery must be removed and replaced. To replace it, the patient’s body is opened, once again, to acquire a healthy section of artery. Usually, this blood vessel is removed from an artery located in the calf of the leg. This means the patient now has two painful incisions that must heal at the same time. There is far more risk in such bypass surgery than in angioplasty, which involves threading a thin tube, called a catheter, into the circulatory system and working it to the damaged artery.

Angioplasty may take between 30 minutes to 3 hours to complete. It begins with a distinctive dye that is injected into the bloodstream. A thin catheter is then inserted into the femoral artery of the leg, near the groin. The doctor monitors the path of the dye using x-rays. He moves the tube through the heart and into the plague-filled artery. He inflates the balloon, creating more space, deflates the balloon, and removes the tube. It is important to note that the plaque has not been removed; it has just been compressed against the sides of the artery. Sometimes, a stent may be implanted, a tiny tube of stainless steel that is expandable when necessary. Its function is to keep the artery open.

There is good news and there is bad news. The good news is that the statistics compiled are superb. Ninety percent of all angioplasty procedures are successful. The risk of dying during an operation of this type is less than 2%. The risk of heart attack is also small: 3-5%. Yet heart surgeons do not take any risk lightly; therefore, a team of surgeons stands ready to perform bypass surgery if needed. The length of hospitalization is only three days. The bad news is twofold. First, this procedure treats the condition but does not eradicate the cause. In 20% of the cases, there is a recurrence of plaque. Second, angioplasty is not recommended for all patients. The surgeons must consider the patient’s age, physical history, how severe the blockage is, and, finally, the degree of damage to the artery before they make their determination.

19. Which one of the following statements is true?





The loves of the Ancient Greeks revolved around eris, a concept by which they defined the universe. They believed that the world existed in a condition of opposites. If there was good, then there was evil, if there was love then there was hatred; joy, then sorrow; was then peace and so on. The Greeks believed that good eris occurred when one held a balanced outlook on life and coped with problems as they arose. It was a kind of ease of living that came from trying to bring together the great opposing forces in nature. Bad eris was evident in the violent conditions that ruled men’s lives. Although these things were found in nature and sometimes could not be controlled, it was believed that bad eris occurred when one ignored a problem, letting it grow larger until it destroyed not only that person, but his family as well. The Ancient Greeks saw eris as a goddess: Eris, the Goddess of Discord, better known as Trouble.

One myth that expresses this concept of bad eris deals with the marriage of King Peleus and the river goddess Thetis. Zeus, the supreme ruler, learns that Thetis would bear a child strong enough to destroy its father. Not wanting to father his own ruin, Zeus convinces Thetis to marry a human, a mortal whose child could never challenge the gods. He promises her, among other things, the greatest wedding in all of Heaven and Earth and allows the couple to invite whomever they please. This is one of the first mixed marriages of Greek Mythology and the lesson leanred from it still applies today. They do invite everyone… except Eris, the Goddess of Discord. In other words, instead of facing the problems brought on by a mixed marriage, they turn their on them. They refused to deal directly with their problems and the result is tragic. In her fury, Eris arrives, ruins the wedding, causes a jealous feud between the three major goddesses over a golden apple, and sets in place the conditions that lead to the Trojan War. The war would take place 20 years in the future, leaving the couple with no legitimate heirs to the throne.

Hence, when we are told, “If you don’t invite trouble, trouble comes”, it means that if we don’t deal with our problems, our problems will deal with us… with a vengeance! It is easy to see why the Greeks considered many of their myths learning myths, for this one teaches us the best way to defeat that which can destroy us.

20. According to the passage, the ancient Greeks believed that the concept of eirs defined the universe





The loves of the Ancient Greeks revolved around eris, a concept by which they defined the universe. They believed that the world existed in a condition of opposites. If there was good, then there was evil, if there was love then there was hatred; joy, then sorrow; was then peace and so on. The Greeks believed that good eris occurred when one held a balanced outlook on life and coped with problems as they arose. It was a kind of ease of living that came from trying to bring together the great opposing forces in nature. Bad eris was evident in the violent conditions that ruled men’s lives. Although these things were found in nature and sometimes could not be controlled, it was believed that bad eris occurred when one ignored a problem, letting it grow larger until it destroyed not only that person, but his family as well. The Ancient Greeks saw eris as a goddess: Eris, the Goddess of Discord, better known as Trouble.

One myth that expresses this concept of bad eris deals with the marriage of King Peleus and the river goddess Thetis. Zeus, the supreme ruler, learns that Thetis would bear a child strong enough to destroy its father. Not wanting to father his own ruin, Zeus convinces Thetis to marry a human, a mortal whose child could never challenge the gods. He promises her, among other things, the greatest wedding in all of Heaven and Earth and allows the couple to invite whomever they please. This is one of the first mixed marriages of Greek Mythology and the lesson leanred from it still applies today. They do invite everyone… except Eris, the Goddess of Discord. In other words, instead of facing the problems brought on by a mixed marriage, they turn their on them. They refused to deal directly with their problems and the result is tragic. In her fury, Eris arrives, ruins the wedding, causes a jealous feud between the three major goddesses over a golden apple, and sets in place the conditions that lead to the Trojan War. The war would take place 20 years in the future, leaving the couple with no legitimate heirs to the throne.

Hence, when we are told, “If you don’t invite trouble, trouble comes”, it means that if we don’t deal with our problems, our problems will deal with us… with a vengeance! It is easy to see why the Greeks considered many of their myths learning myths, for this one teaches us the best way to defeat that which can destroy us.

21. Most specifically, bad eris is defined in the passage as





The loves of the Ancient Greeks revolved around eris, a concept by which they defined the universe. They believed that the world existed in a condition of opposites. If there was good, then there was evil, if there was love then there was hatred; joy, then sorrow; was then peace and so on. The Greeks believed that good eris occurred when one held a balanced outlook on life and coped with problems as they arose. It was a kind of ease of living that came from trying to bring together the great opposing forces in nature. Bad eris was evident in the violent conditions that ruled men’s lives. Although these things were found in nature and sometimes could not be controlled, it was believed that bad eris occurred when one ignored a problem, letting it grow larger until it destroyed not only that person, but his family as well. The Ancient Greeks saw eris as a goddess: Eris, the Goddess of Discord, better known as Trouble.

One myth that expresses this concept of bad eris deals with the marriage of King Peleus and the river goddess Thetis. Zeus, the supreme ruler, learns that Thetis would bear a child strong enough to destroy its father. Not wanting to father his own ruin, Zeus convinces Thetis to marry a human, a mortal whose child could never challenge the gods. He promises her, among other things, the greatest wedding in all of Heaven and Earth and allows the couple to invite whomever they please. This is one of the first mixed marriages of Greek Mythology and the lesson leanred from it still applies today. They do invite everyone… except Eris, the Goddess of Discord. In other words, instead of facing the problems brought on by a mixed marriage, they turn their on them. They refused to deal directly with their problems and the result is tragic. In her fury, Eris arrives, ruins the wedding, causes a jealous feud between the three major goddesses over a golden apple, and sets in place the conditions that lead to the Trojan War. The war would take place 20 years in the future, leaving the couple with no legitimate heirs to the throne.

Hence, when we are told, “If you don’t invite trouble, trouble comes”, it means that if we don’t deal with our problems, our problems will deal with us… with a vengeance! It is easy to see why the Greeks considered many of their myths learning myths, for this one teaches us the best way to defeat that which can destroy us.

22. It can be inferred that Zeus married Thetis off because





The loves of the Ancient Greeks revolved around eris, a concept by which they defined the universe. They believed that the world existed in a condition of opposites. If there was good, then there was evil, if there was love then there was hatred; joy, then sorrow; was then peace and so on. The Greeks believed that good eris occurred when one held a balanced outlook on life and coped with problems as they arose. It was a kind of ease of living that came from trying to bring together the great opposing forces in nature. Bad eris was evident in the violent conditions that ruled men’s lives. Although these things were found in nature and sometimes could not be controlled, it was believed that bad eris occurred when one ignored a problem, letting it grow larger until it destroyed not only that person, but his family as well. The Ancient Greeks saw eris as a goddess: Eris, the Goddess of Discord, better known as Trouble.

One myth that expresses this concept of bad eris deals with the marriage of King Peleus and the river goddess Thetis. Zeus, the supreme ruler, learns that Thetis would bear a child strong enough to destroy its father. Not wanting to father his own ruin, Zeus convinces Thetis to marry a human, a mortal whose child could never challenge the gods. He promises her, among other things, the greatest wedding in all of Heaven and Earth and allows the couple to invite whomever they please. This is one of the first mixed marriages of Greek Mythology and the lesson leanred from it still applies today. They do invite everyone… except Eris, the Goddess of Discord. In other words, instead of facing the problems brought on by a mixed marriage, they turn their on them. They refused to deal directly with their problems and the result is tragic. In her fury, Eris arrives, ruins the wedding, causes a jealous feud between the three major goddesses over a golden apple, and sets in place the conditions that lead to the Trojan War. The war would take place 20 years in the future, leaving the couple with no legitimate heirs to the throne.

Hence, when we are told, “If you don’t invite trouble, trouble comes”, it means that if we don’t deal with our problems, our problems will deal with us… with a vengeance! It is easy to see why the Greeks considered many of their myths learning myths, for this one teaches us the best way to defeat that which can destroy us.

23. It can also be inferred that Zeus did not fear a child sired by King Peleus because





The loves of the Ancient Greeks revolved around eris, a concept by which they defined the universe. They believed that the world existed in a condition of opposites. If there was good, then there was evil, if there was love then there was hatred; joy, then sorrow; was then peace and so on. The Greeks believed that good eris occurred when one held a balanced outlook on life and coped with problems as they arose. It was a kind of ease of living that came from trying to bring together the great opposing forces in nature. Bad eris was evident in the violent conditions that ruled men’s lives. Although these things were found in nature and sometimes could not be controlled, it was believed that bad eris occurred when one ignored a problem, letting it grow larger until it destroyed not only that person, but his family as well. The Ancient Greeks saw eris as a goddess: Eris, the Goddess of Discord, better known as Trouble.

One myth that expresses this concept of bad eris deals with the marriage of King Peleus and the river goddess Thetis. Zeus, the supreme ruler, learns that Thetis would bear a child strong enough to destroy its father. Not wanting to father his own ruin, Zeus convinces Thetis to marry a human, a mortal whose child could never challenge the gods. He promises her, among other things, the greatest wedding in all of Heaven and Earth and allows the couple to invite whomever they please. This is one of the first mixed marriages of Greek Mythology and the lesson leanred from it still applies today. They do invite everyone… except Eris, the Goddess of Discord. In other words, instead of facing the problems brought on by a mixed marriage, they turn their on them. They refused to deal directly with their problems and the result is tragic. In her fury, Eris arrives, ruins the wedding, causes a jealous feud between the three major goddesses over a golden apple, and sets in place the conditions that lead to the Trojan War. The war would take place 20 years in the future, leaving the couple with no legitimate heirs to the throne.

Hence, when we are told, “If you don’t invite trouble, trouble comes”, it means that if we don’t deal with our problems, our problems will deal with us… with a vengeance! It is easy to see why the Greeks considered many of their myths learning myths, for this one teaches us the best way to defeat that which can destroy us.

24. According to the passage, Achilles





The loves of the Ancient Greeks revolved around eris, a concept by which they defined the universe. They believed that the world existed in a condition of opposites. If there was good, then there was evil, if there was love then there was hatred; joy, then sorrow; was then peace and so on. The Greeks believed that good eris occurred when one held a balanced outlook on life and coped with problems as they arose. It was a kind of ease of living that came from trying to bring together the great opposing forces in nature. Bad eris was evident in the violent conditions that ruled men’s lives. Although these things were found in nature and sometimes could not be controlled, it was believed that bad eris occurred when one ignored a problem, letting it grow larger until it destroyed not only that person, but his family as well. The Ancient Greeks saw eris as a goddess: Eris, the Goddess of Discord, better known as Trouble.

One myth that expresses this concept of bad eris deals with the marriage of King Peleus and the river goddess Thetis. Zeus, the supreme ruler, learns that Thetis would bear a child strong enough to destroy its father. Not wanting to father his own ruin, Zeus convinces Thetis to marry a human, a mortal whose child could never challenge the gods. He promises her, among other things, the greatest wedding in all of Heaven and Earth and allows the couple to invite whomever they please. This is one of the first mixed marriages of Greek Mythology and the lesson leanred from it still applies today. They do invite everyone… except Eris, the Goddess of Discord. In other words, instead of facing the problems brought on by a mixed marriage, they turn their on them. They refused to deal directly with their problems and the result is tragic. In her fury, Eris arrives, ruins the wedding, causes a jealous feud between the three major goddesses over a golden apple, and sets in place the conditions that lead to the Trojan War. The war would take place 20 years in the future, leaving the couple with no legitimate heirs to the throne.

Hence, when we are told, “If you don’t invite trouble, trouble comes”, it means that if we don’t deal with our problems, our problems will deal with us… with a vengeance! It is easy to see why the Greeks considered many of their myths learning myths, for this one teaches us the best way to defeat that which can destroy us.

25. Which of the following statements in the message offered in the myth?









34 COMMENTS

  1. Thanks a ton! I got 23, but I made mistakes buy using keyboard instead of mouse. The options jumped up and down (if my words make any sense!)

    Pweeessee post some more, with a higher difficulty level, whenever you get time.

    Fang you! 🙂

  2. well d ques were really gud……………..although d passages were nt very difficult still d tym factor rules – clatgyan hz alwys posted ques relevant 2 d clat pattern ………..thnx guys………….u rock!!!!!!!

    • all are idioms, blue moon- as in once in a blue moon , blue black- as in after a fight, then it’d be black sheep- a bad name for the family.

  3. @subhankar-
    there was a prophecy that the child of thetis would be stronger than the father. Zeus did not want to run the risk of fathering such a child. therefore he decided to marry her off to a mortal (Peleus) because he assumed that a child borne by her with a mortal would not be that powerful.

  4. scored 25 on 25!:D….but this was very easy wasnt it?..anyhow u guys r doing a great job ..cant thank u enought for this….but still anyone can tell me wat the d difficulty on clat is?

  5. i scored 23……hmmm anyways that was easy……plz do try to post some paragraphs based on economics……i think that would be toughest…

  6. 23 , but then it was kind of easy. The tougher passages give a lotta trbl. Especially wid da ambiguous inferences.

  7. got 23 of 25 …….but this is not enough ………d passage was too easy ……….and i think passage in d clat wont be easy

  8. Thanks for putting up the RC exercise. 🙂

    Ideally how long should it take to do the Reading Comprehension bit of CLAT?

    Also, some people say it’s best to do RC in the end. What’s your take on that?

  9. Well, 23/25. I guess there was a problem regarding Question 4 of the bicycle Passage. The rims were obviously introduced to make the journey less tiring. How does it make the tires last longer (As the answer suggests) is quite unclear. So, could you please let me know about that?

  10. got 21/25….in 8 minutes…(2 marks were silly mistake).. :/
    easy passages,though….gud enough,a score like that?
    do tell me…need your advice.. 🙂

  11. revolved around eris, a concept by which they defined the universe. They believed that the world existed in a condition of opposites. If there was good, then there was evil, if there was love then there was hatred; joy, then sorrow; was then peace and so on. The Greeks believed that good eris occurred when one held a balanced outlook on life and coped with problems as they arose. It was a kind of ease of living that came from trying to bring together the great opposing forces in nature. Bad eris was evident in the violent conditions that ruled men’s lives. Although these things were found in nature and sometimes could not be controlled, it was believed that bad eris occurred when one ignored a problem, letting it grow larger until it destroyed not only that person, but his family as well. The Ancient Greeks saw eris as a goddess: Eris, the Goddess of Discord, better known as Trouble.
    One myth that expresses this concept of bad eris deals with the marriage of King Peleus and the river goddess Thetis. Zeus, the supreme ruler, learns that Thetis would bear a child strong enough to destroy its father. Not wanting to father his own ruin, Zeus convinces Thetis to marry a human, a mortal whose child could never challenge the gods. He promises her, among other things, the greatest wedding in all of Heaven and Earth and allows the couple to invite whomever they please. This is one of the first mixed marriages of Greek Mythology and the lesson leanred from it still applies today. They do invite everyone… except Eris, the Goddess of Discord. In other words, instead of facing the problems brought on by a mixed marriage, they turn their on them. They refused to deal directly with their problems and the result is tragic. In her fury, Eris arrives, ruins the wedding, causes a jealous feud between the three major goddesses over a golden apple, and sets in place the conditions that lead to the Trojan War. The war would take place 20 years in the future, leaving the couple with no legitimate heirs to the throne. 
    Hence, when we are told, “If you don’t invite trouble, trouble comes”, it means that if we don’t deal with our problems, our problems will deal with us… with a vengeance! It is easy to see why the Greeks considered many of their myths learning myths, for this one teaches us the best way to defeat that which can destroy us.

    21. Most specifically, bad eris is defined in the passage as
    the violent conditions of life.the problems man encounters.the evil goddess who has a golden apple.the murderer of generations.

    You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed.You might want to read…Interest – Part IIGeneral Knowledge Compendium 14Cracking the GD & PI of Symbiosis Law SchoolImportant Conventions, Treaties & Agreements – 1You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.25 Responses to “Reading Comprehension Exercise 1”
    L. Gopika Murthy said on Tuesday, March 22, 2011, 21:28
    Thanks for this exercise. Please post some more passages (preferably harder) when you get time………
    Reply

    Asad Reply:March 22nd, 2011 at 11:38 PM
    Yup! We’ll put up one exercise every week… And yeah, the difficulty will gradually increase.
    Reply

    Sai Subhankar Reply:March 23rd, 2011 at 6:23 AM
    Hey,can you explain the question about Zeus not wanting the marriage?
    Reply

    Apurva said on Wednesday, March 23, 2011, 15:04
    Thanks a ton! I got 23, but I made mistakes buy using keyboard instead of mouse. The options jumped up and down (if my words make any sense!)
    Pweeessee post some more, with a higher difficulty level, whenever you get time.
    Fang you! 
    Reply

    chinmayee das said on Wednesday, March 23, 2011, 18:47
    well d ques were really gud……………..although d passages were nt very difficult still d tym factor rules – clatgyan hz alwys posted ques relevant 2 d clat pattern ………..thnx guys………….u rock!!!!!!!
    Reply

    samarth said on Thursday, March 24, 2011, 3:21
    CLAT2010[LOGICAL]BLUE:MOON,BLUE:BLACK,BLACK:?A.SHEEPB.GOATC.SKYD.STARPLZ EXPLAIN IT.
    Reply

    Shivam Bhardwaj Reply:March 25th, 2011 at 10:10 AM
    all are idioms, blue moon- as in once in a blue moon , blue black- as in after a fight, then it’d be black sheep- a bad name for the family.
    Reply

    Sohini said on Thursday, March 24, 2011, 19:52
    Thanks for this… please post tougher passages….
    Reply

    Sohini said on Thursday, March 24, 2011, 19:57
    @subhankar-there was a prophecy that the child of thetis would be stronger than the father. Zeus did not want to run the risk of fathering such a child. therefore he decided to marry her off to a mortal (Peleus) because he assumed that a child borne by her with a mortal would not be that powerful.
    Reply

    shantanu said on Friday, March 25, 2011, 0:05
    scored 23 on 25… sounds good but the passaes were easy….
    Reply

    Chitwan said on Friday, March 25, 2011, 13:40
    scored 25 on 25!:D….but this was very easy wasnt it?..anyhow u guys r doing a great job ..cant thank u enought for this….but still anyone can tell me wat the d difficulty on clat is?
    Reply

    Shipra Chaudhary said on Friday, March 25, 2011, 21:18
    I got 18 on 25!!!! I am really worried ….. wat should I do to per form better ?
    Reply

    Apoorva said on Saturday, March 26, 2011, 1:50
    Scored 23 
    Reply

    shrishtee bajpai said on Saturday, March 26, 2011, 18:36
    scored 21 . not happy they deserved 25/25.
    Reply

    Aditi said on Monday, March 28, 2011, 12:37
    Scored 23. Surprise  Keep posting tougher stuff.
    Reply

    Lalit Kumar said on Tuesday, March 29, 2011, 22:17
    i scored 23……hmmm anyways that was easy……plz do try to post some paragraphs based on economics……i think that would be toughest…
    Reply

    Anshul Roy said on Wednesday, April 6, 2011, 15:31
    23 , but then it was kind of easy. The tougher passages give a lotta trbl. Especially wid da ambiguous inferences.
    Reply

    SANKALP said on Thursday, April 7, 2011, 0:02
    UNFORTUNATELY SCORED 19 ,I AM WORRIED ABOUT RC,PLEASE PUT SOME MORE TOUGHER STUFFS FOR PRACTICES
    Reply

    choudhary krishna said on Saturday, April 9, 2011, 15:57
    got 23 of 25 …….but this is not enough ………d passage was too easy ……….and i think passage in d clat wont be easy
    Reply

    Deepthi said on Sunday, April 10, 2011, 20:57
    Thanks for putting up the RC exercise. 
    Ideally how long should it take to do the Reading Comprehension bit of CLAT?
    Also, some people say it’s best to do RC in the end. What’s your take on that?
    Reply

    SIDDHARTH said on Monday, April 25, 2011, 22:27
    WAH! THANKS A LOT I GOT A GOOD PRACTICE.
    Reply

    Abhisek Ghosh said on Thursday, May 5, 2011, 0:06
    Well, 23/25. I guess there was a problem regarding Question 4 of the bicycle Passage. The rims were obviously introduced to make the journey less tiring. How does it make the tires last longer (As the answer suggests) is quite unclear. So, could you please let me know about that?
    Reply

    mushira said on Thursday, May 5, 2011, 22:28
    got 21/25….in 8 minutes…(2 marks were silly mistake).. :/easy passages,though….gud enough,a score like that?do tell me…need your advice.. 
    Reply

    lakshmi said on Sunday, May 15, 2011, 18:57
    hey i scored a 23 but i need to ask where was this thing about Achilles mentioned in the greek passage?
    Reply

    Bishnu priya said on Sunday, June 26, 2011, 23:45
    hey..scored 19. a lil worried as d passeges were really easy.plz put tougher passages as in clat.thanx
    Reply
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