English Mixed Bag Exercise – 1

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This Quiz is a mixed bag and has 25 questions. Select the answers and click “Next”. Time yourself for 12 minutes. (one shouldn’t take more than that to answer these questions). All the answers and explanations will be displayed after the completion of the quiz. Go ahead… All the best!!

1. Choose the correct spelling :





2. Choose the wrong spelling :





3. Which of these is not a word in the English language?





4. Which of the following sentences is incorrect?





5. Add a gerund without changing the meaning, ‘Due to old age, I find it difficult to clean my house.’





6. Select the appropriate word synonymous to the given word.

CORPULENCE





7. Select the appropriate word synonymous to the given word

PITHINESS





8. ‘Yardley, I want you to bowl to his body.’ Change to indirect speech.





9. It is not possible to mix oil ______ water. (NLU Delhi 2008)





Read the following passage and answer the questions 10-14. These questions are in the form of statements, and one has to answer according to the options provided. (Four questions in the NLU-J 2006 paper was of this type).

Japan's decline began in the mid-1980s. The economy was overheated. In response to pressure from the United States, Tokyo was forced to substantially revalue the yen, making its exports more expensive. To offset the losses, the Japanese government pumped massive amounts of money into the economy, and the central bank drastically lowered its prime lending rate. With the cheap money, the Japanese began speculating in stocks and real estate. The property where the emperor's palace stood in downtown Tokyo was supposedly worth as much at the time as the whole of California. And because terrestrial profits were no longer enough for them, Japanese developers seriously began planning cities in the ocean and on the Moon. But then the Bank of Japan began feeling queasy about the boom and raised interest rates. This led to a massive crash on the Tokyo stock market, followed by a sharp decline in the real estate market. After that, Japan kept launching new economic stimulus programs to save what was left to save. In the process, it accumulated more debt in relation to economic output than any other leading industrialized nation. The stimulus programs didn't do much good. Admittedly Japan is by no means Greece, which profited at the expense of its European neighbours. Instead, the Japanese government borrowed from its own thrifty citizens. The Japanese are now doing their best to save face. It is a dignified decline, but in the process Japan is in danger of using up its own reserves.

(Land of the Setting Sun - Can Japan Reverse Its Long Decline? By Wieland Wagner, taken from www.spiegel.de )

10. The Central Bank lowered its prime lending rate to balance the losses made by the yen being devalued.




Read the following passage and answer the questions 10-14. These questions are in the form of statements, and one has to answer according to the options provided. (Four questions in the NLU-J 2006 paper was of this type).

Japan's decline began in the mid-1980s. The economy was overheated. In response to pressure from the United States, Tokyo was forced to substantially revalue the yen, making its exports more expensive. To offset the losses, the Japanese government pumped massive amounts of money into the economy, and the central bank drastically lowered its prime lending rate. With the cheap money, the Japanese began speculating in stocks and real estate. The property where the emperor's palace stood in downtown Tokyo was supposedly worth as much at the time as the whole of California. And because terrestrial profits were no longer enough for them, Japanese developers seriously began planning cities in the ocean and on the Moon. But then the Bank of Japan began feeling queasy about the boom and raised interest rates. This led to a massive crash on the Tokyo stock market, followed by a sharp decline in the real estate market. After that, Japan kept launching new economic stimulus programs to save what was left to save. In the process, it accumulated more debt in relation to economic output than any other leading industrialized nation. The stimulus programs didn't do much good. Admittedly Japan is by no means Greece, which profited at the expense of its European neighbours. Instead, the Japanese government borrowed from its own thrifty citizens. The Japanese are now doing their best to save face. It is a dignified decline, but in the process Japan is in danger of using up its own reserves.

(Land of the Setting Sun - Can Japan Reverse Its Long Decline? By Wieland Wagner, taken from www.spiegel.de )

11. Statement I - The Japanese Government, after the economic collapse, borrowed from its own citizens.
Statement II - Cold-blooded animals, when they hibernate, consume the food they store in their bodies during the winter.

Are these two statements based on the same underlying principle?




Read the following passage and answer the questions 10-14. These questions are in the form of statements, and one has to answer according to the options provided. (Four questions in the NLU-J 2006 paper was of this type).

Japan's decline began in the mid-1980s. The economy was overheated. In response to pressure from the United States, Tokyo was forced to substantially revalue the yen, making its exports more expensive. To offset the losses, the Japanese government pumped massive amounts of money into the economy, and the central bank drastically lowered its prime lending rate. With the cheap money, the Japanese began speculating in stocks and real estate. The property where the emperor's palace stood in downtown Tokyo was supposedly worth as much at the time as the whole of California. And because terrestrial profits were no longer enough for them, Japanese developers seriously began planning cities in the ocean and on the Moon. But then the Bank of Japan began feeling queasy about the boom and raised interest rates. This led to a massive crash on the Tokyo stock market, followed by a sharp decline in the real estate market. After that, Japan kept launching new economic stimulus programs to save what was left to save. In the process, it accumulated more debt in relation to economic output than any other leading industrialized nation. The stimulus programs didn't do much good. Admittedly Japan is by no means Greece, which profited at the expense of its European neighbours. Instead, the Japanese government borrowed from its own thrifty citizens. The Japanese are now doing their best to save face. It is a dignified decline, but in the process Japan is in danger of using up its own reserves.

(Land of the Setting Sun - Can Japan Reverse Its Long Decline? By Wieland Wagner, taken from www.spiegel.de )

12. Statement I - The property where the emperor's palace stood in downtown Tokyo was supposedly worth as much at the time as the whole of California.
Statement II - Property developers began planning cities underwater, and on the moon.

Choose one of the options which is most appropriate –





Read the following passage and answer the questions 10-14. These questions are in the form of statements, and one has to answer according to the options provided. (Four questions in the NLU-J 2006 paper was of this type).

Japan's decline began in the mid-1980s. The economy was overheated. In response to pressure from the United States, Tokyo was forced to substantially revalue the yen, making its exports more expensive. To offset the losses, the Japanese government pumped massive amounts of money into the economy, and the central bank drastically lowered its prime lending rate. With the cheap money, the Japanese began speculating in stocks and real estate. The property where the emperor's palace stood in downtown Tokyo was supposedly worth as much at the time as the whole of California. And because terrestrial profits were no longer enough for them, Japanese developers seriously began planning cities in the ocean and on the Moon. But then the Bank of Japan began feeling queasy about the boom and raised interest rates. This led to a massive crash on the Tokyo stock market, followed by a sharp decline in the real estate market. After that, Japan kept launching new economic stimulus programs to save what was left to save. In the process, it accumulated more debt in relation to economic output than any other leading industrialized nation. The stimulus programs didn't do much good. Admittedly Japan is by no means Greece, which profited at the expense of its European neighbours. Instead, the Japanese government borrowed from its own thrifty citizens. The Japanese are now doing their best to save face. It is a dignified decline, but in the process Japan is in danger of using up its own reserves.

(Land of the Setting Sun - Can Japan Reverse Its Long Decline? By Wieland Wagner, taken from www.spiegel.de )

13. ‘Admittedly Japan is by no means Greece, which profited at the expense of its European neighbours’. Does this mean Greece exploited its neighbouring countries, logically speaking?





Read the following passage and answer the questions 10-14. These questions are in the form of statements, and one has to answer according to the options provided. (Four questions in the NLU-J 2006 paper was of this type).

Japan's decline began in the mid-1980s. The economy was overheated. In response to pressure from the United States, Tokyo was forced to substantially revalue the yen, making its exports more expensive. To offset the losses, the Japanese government pumped massive amounts of money into the economy, and the central bank drastically lowered its prime lending rate. With the cheap money, the Japanese began speculating in stocks and real estate. The property where the emperor's palace stood in downtown Tokyo was supposedly worth as much at the time as the whole of California. And because terrestrial profits were no longer enough for them, Japanese developers seriously began planning cities in the ocean and on the Moon. But then the Bank of Japan began feeling queasy about the boom and raised interest rates. This led to a massive crash on the Tokyo stock market, followed by a sharp decline in the real estate market. After that, Japan kept launching new economic stimulus programs to save what was left to save. In the process, it accumulated more debt in relation to economic output than any other leading industrialized nation. The stimulus programs didn't do much good. Admittedly Japan is by no means Greece, which profited at the expense of its European neighbours. Instead, the Japanese government borrowed from its own thrifty citizens. The Japanese are now doing their best to save face. It is a dignified decline, but in the process Japan is in danger of using up its own reserves.

(Land of the Setting Sun - Can Japan Reverse Its Long Decline? By Wieland Wagner, taken from www.spiegel.de )

14. ‘But then the Bank of Japan began feeling queasy about the boom and raised interest rates’. Was the Bank of Japan’s actions directly influenced by US pressure?




15. "Because most references to dogs by characters in Shakespeare’s plays are derogatory, it has been argued that Shakespeare did not like dogs."

Which of the following is the strongest objection to the argument above? (NLSIU 1988)





16. Judges need to be ______ to all matters if miscarriage of justice is to be avoided.





17. It is left to the ____ of the President whether he wishes to hold a clemency hearing or not.





18. Choose a suitable antonym

CONSTERNATION





19. Choose a suitable antonym

EUPHORIA





In 20 and 21, two sentences are given, wherein one of the parts underlined is inappropriate for the sentence as a whole.

20. He is a doubtful (A) / opponent, you must (B)/ respect and fear him (C)/ at all times (D). (NALSAR 2004)





In 20 and 21, two sentences are given, wherein one of the parts underlined is inappropriate for the sentence as a whole.

21. I am worried (A)/ about your future. (B)/ You are (C)/ studying well. (D).





22. Water : Ship :: ?





23. India : Shining :: ?





In 24 and 25, give the best inference.

24. Police serve their country.





In 24 and 25, give the best inference.


25. A liar says, ‘I am lying’.









<br/ >Quiz Made by : Karthik Suresh(Editor, CLATGyan)

36 COMMENTS

  1. I scored 23. But that’s not the point..I was lucky in 2 questions…but that’s not the point either. The point is Question number 15. I knew the question and I knew the answer too. I have checked with more than two sources (LST,Wadhwa..and another book as well) and the answer that they give is – c. Although..I find it absurd…and would rather ‘d’ was the answer…but I still don’t understand how LST and all the other books ended up making the same mistake…

    Unless…of course..they all copied from each other. Damn 😐

  2. can you please explain question 25.. since it has already been given that the person is a liar, how can he say the truth….?why won’t the answer be a or c??

  3. @ Premangsu – ‘D’ is sure the answer, I dunno abt LST materials being wrong.
    Dude, if you think an answer is right, just mark it, don’t think about whether some book gave some other option as correct, in the same question.
    @ Sabika – It has to be D. No reasonable person would worry about your studies, when you are doing well. But yeah, the question is deceptive that way, so, don’t fret on it.
    And in 25,
    Ah! The Liar’s parody!!! This one’s a concept in logical language use. When a liar says hes lying, he may be saying the truth. Or he may be lying! Use your head here.
    You need to work on your logic. If you better your logical skills, pakka you’ll make it!

  4. @ Rohit… Start with the basics. Do Wren and Martin. Also do all the previous papers’ and then start doing these kind of real questions. You have time for all this. But, be quick. You’ll be fine. 🙂

  5. The Yardley question –
    Now, (for those who watched ‘Lagaan’ this is familiar)
    Capt. Russell, asks Yardley to bowl to the batsman’s body in the movie.
    But, in the given sentence, there is NO mention of a batsman. So D is wrong.
    The answer is C, we use the pronoun ‘his’
    Remember a generality in direct/indirect sentences – if the third person is present in the form of a second-person pronoun, use the pronoun as it is in the indirect speech.

  6. ding dong! I scored 17, but I find some questions have more than one answer…
    pay attention to this!
    I am worried (A)/ about your future. (B)/ You are (C)/ studying well. (D).
    now
    I am worried about your future. You are NOT studying well. (here the ans becomes C)
    I am NOT worried about your future. You are studying well. (A)

    also,
    This – Due to old age, I find cleaning my house is difficult.
    should be – Due to old age, I find cleaning my house difficult. OR
    Due to old age, I find THAT cleaning my house is difficult.

  7. Hi all, I’ve finally settle down with a theme(there’s more to do and customize) and also done my homework. Tell me what do you think, vimax 3-4 Dot Com. I’m not sure you guys can add a comment about the products? We can help out each another commenting on it? I’m not sure. Of course not about products review but tips, fashion, coupon and lots more. Any idea? Thanks! XR2011K6

  8. Um i think something is wrong with the quiz, cuz i did mark the right answers, but when the results came it came out wrong? :\ I managed to get a 23 thats why.. otherwise i wouldnt mind..

  9. evn i got 11….:(..can u pls give me some tips..am pretty much good in other sections compared to english..now i gotta concentrate on this…pls lend me some tips guys…:)

  10. hi…… Due to old age, I find cleaning my house is difficult…this ans is grammatically in correct (question 5)….i got 17 btw …. :/….can u pls verify if its correct….
                                                                                                                                     thanx a lot

  11. i got 18, rather ordinary :/ but that’s not the point. the problem is with no. 21. why cant it be “i am NOT worried about your future. you are studying well” ?? the way i analysed it the answer should be ‘a’..

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